Archery score determining means and process

Abstract

Claims

April 30, 1968 A s. o. ROULEAU ARCHERY SCORE DETERMINING MEANS AND PROCESS Filed Feb. 17. 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 oz ges Grab Eou/ea a BY WMM $544M 1 A rvwwsy pril 30. 1968 G. o. ROULEAU 3,380,171 ARCHERY SCORE DETERMINING MEANS AND PROCESS Filed Feb. 17. 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Geo .9 01470 Pod/em HIS ATTORAQQK United States Patent 3,380,171 ARCHERY SCQRE DETERMINING MEANS AND PRGCESS Georges ()vila Rouleau, 19104 Woodcrest, Harper Woods, Mich. 48236 Filed Feb. 17, 1966, Ser. No. 528,124 8 Claims. (Cl. 33-474) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An archery score determining gage in the form of a disc-like member having a set of arrow shaft engaging sockets indented from and disposed around one-half of its circumferential edge and an oppositely positioned set of corresponding sockets indented from and disposed around the other half of its circumferential edge. The sockets of each set are formed on a circular arc, the radii of which are different and equal, respectively, to that of different size arrow shafts. The corresponding matching, oppositely positioned, sockets of each set are disposed on a respective diameter of the disc-like member and spaced apart from their centers equal to the radial distance between immediately adjacent target boundaries. My invention relates to archery. The principal object of my invention is the provision of archery score determining means and process by which accurate determination can be made as to the proper score value to be assigned to an arrow embedded in an archery target in questionable score position on the target face. The foregoing object of my invention and its advantages will become apparent during the course of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which: FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view of an archery target having arrows embedded therein in questionable score positions and showing an archery score determining gage ac cording to my invention; FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of a portion of FIG. 1; FIGS. 3A and 3B are enlarged views of portions of FIG. 2; FIGS. 4 and 5, respectively, are front and rear elevational views on different scales of said embodiment; FIGS. 6 and 7 are opposite side elevational views of said embodiment; FIGS. 8 and 9 are sectional views of said embodiment taken, respectively, on the lines 88 and 99 thereof; FIG. 10 is a fragmentary view similar to FIG. 1 showing another archery score determining gage according to my invention; FIG. 11 is an enlarged view of a different portion of FIG. 10; FIGS. 12 and 13 are front and side elevational views, respectively, of said other gage. Referring to the drawings in greater detail and first to FIGS. 1 through 9, 11 designates a portion of an archery target having a target face thereon which, in the instance, corresponds with the Ofiicial P.A.A. (Professional Archers Association) Indoor Target Face which is made up of concentric circles 12, 13, 14 and 15 of progressively larger diameter bounding areas having different score values. Such areas comprise a center circular area designated 5 corresponding to the score value assigned thereto and annular areas surrounding said center area designated 4, 3, 2 and 1, respectively, corresponding to their respective score values. The center circular area 5 is white and the annular areas 4, 3, 2 and 1 are black. The double line for each concentric circle indicates the thin (60 thousandths of an inch) white band separating adjacent black annular areas. Patented Apr. 30, 1968 An arrow 18 is embedded in the target 11 in a questionable score position closely adjoining the circular boundary 12 between the center area 5 and the immediately adjacent annular area 4. Similarly, an arrow 20 is embedded in the target 11 in another questionable score position closely adjoining the circular boundary 13 between immediately adjacent annular areas 4 and 3. Against each such arrow is shown an archery score determining gage according to my invention, generally designated 25, to gage in the case of the arrow 18 whether it is wholly with in the annular area 4 (in which case the proper score value to be assigned to the arrow is 4) or whether it is partly in both the annular area 4 and the center area 5 (in which case the proper score value to be assigned to the arrow is 5) and to gage in the case of the arrow 20 whether its proper score value is 3 or 4 (i.e. whether it is wholly within the annular area 3 or whether it is partly in both the annular areas 4 and 3). The gage 25 is in the form of a disc-like member which has a set of shaft engaging sockets 27 disposed around one half of its circumference and a set of other sockets 29 disposed around the other half. The set of sockets 27 are numbered from 4, 5, etc. through 9, 0, in the instance, to accommodate different size arrow shafts whose diameters vary from etc. through of an inch. The set of sockets 29 correspond to the same size arrow shafts and are similarly numbered from 4, 5, etc. through 9, 0. Corresponding sockets of the two sets of sockets 27 and 29 are diametrically disposed as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 for the opposing sockets 6, 6 being used to determine the proper score value to be assigned to the arrow 18. (Although the socket numbers are omitted in FIG. 1 because of the scale thereof the opposing sockets 0, G are shown being used to determine the proper score value for the arrow 20.) The diametric distance between opposing sockets vary as will be explained and as shown for the sockets 0, 0 and 4, 4 in FIGS. 8 and 9 (which are sectional views through the centers of such sockets and respective diameters of the gage 25) from which it can be seen that the diametric distance between the opposing sockets 0, 0 is less than that between opposing sockets 4, 4. This is bcause the sockets t), 0 accommodate a larger diameter (viz. or 7 of an inch) arrow shaft than that (viz. or A of an inch) accommodated by the sockets 4, 4. The diametric distance between respective opposing sockets is a predetermined distance (depending upon the particular target face) less the diameter of the arrow shaft which they accommodate. This predetermined distance is the radial distance on the target face between concentric circles which is most always constant (within the tolerances normally expected in the printing of target faces on paper and the like) and equal to 1.600 inches in the case of the Ofiicial P.A.A. Indoor Target Face shown in FIG. 1. The diametric distance between respective opposing sockets is measured between the low points thereon, such as the low points 31 and 33, shown for opposing sockets 6, 6 in FIGS. 3A and 3B and along a diameter of the gage 25. Another way of defining the distance between opposing sockets is by use of their centers since in any case of respective opposing sockets the distance between their centers is always equal to such predetermined distance, i.e. the constant radial distance between concentric circles on the target face. This is because to accommodate a particular arrow shaft the opposing sockets are each formed on a circular arc the radius of which is equal (actually a few thousandths oversize as is usually the case with 0D. gages) to that of such shaft. The gage 25 has a flat back face 26 which is annular, in the instance, as shown in FIG. 5 so that in use the gage lies flat on the target face. The gage is used as best shownin FIGS. 2, 3A and 3B in conjunction with arrow 18 by moving it fiat on the target face so that in the case of the arrow 18 (which is a No. 6 arrow) the socket 6 of the set of sockets 27 tangentially engages the shatt of the arrow 18. The gage is then swung about the center of such shaft in sliding engagement therewith as indicated by the dotted outline position shown in FIGS. 2 and 3A for the gage 25 which causes the socket 6 of the set of sockets 29 to be swung about the same center as indicated by the dotted outline positions for the gage shown in FIG. 3B. The sight opening provided by the socket 6 as shown in FIG. 3B is observed to determine if at the low point 33 any portion of the circle 13 appears. If it does this means that the arrow 18 is embedded partly in the area (which includes the circle 12) as well as in the area 4 in which case the proper score value to be assigned thereto is 5. The coverage of the area 4 by the gage 25 as it is swung about the center of the shaft of the arrow 18 is at a maximum when the low point 33 is swung through a radius of the target face passing through such arrow shaft center. The radius 32 shown in FIGS. 2, 3A and 3B shows this point of sighting which is readily seen by watching at the low point 33 of the sight opening provided by the socket 6 as shown in FIG. 3B and observing when the minimum amount of the area 4 and of the circle 13 appears as previously explained. 'If at such point of sighting none appears, then the arrow 18 is embedded wholly within the area 4 in which case the properly assignable score value is 4. To be sure, for example, that the arrow 18 is a number 6 arrow (i.e. that its diameter is or A of an inch), it can be first checked by placing into tangential engagement with the shaft .thereof the socket 6 of the set of sockets 29. This socket like the others of the set 29 contains at least about 135 degrees of circular arc so that it can function as an OD. gage. The value of this is that each user of the gage 25 can check hi opponents arrow size and each referee can check the arrow size of any contestant. No one has to rely on what he is told concerning the size arrow another party is shooting. The sockets of the set 27 have no gaging function and do not require such extent of circular are. In fact each contains only about 45 degrees of circular are so that in swinging the gage 25 about the shaft of the arrow whose score value is in question there will be a minimum of interference from closely spaced arrows particularly those which are embedded in the target askew to the target face. For the same reason the thickness from the back face 26 of the set of sockets 27 to the front face thereof, as at 34, is thinner than that of the set of sockets 29, the front face of which is indicated at 36. The center section of the gage 25 is raised from the flat back face 26 and provided with a central aperture 38 to facilitate moving the gage on the target face. The gage 25 shown in FIGS. 1 through 9 and just described spans one annular area and gages to the next larger concentric circle from that which the arrow adjoins whose score value is in question. Following the foregoing teaching the gage 25 could be modified to span two or more annular areas and gage to any concentric circle. The gage 25 is an outside gage in that in use it is disposed outside the concentric circle adjoined by the arrow whose score value is in question. Following the foregoing teaching the gage could be modified to function as an inside gage so that in use it would be disposed inside the concentric circle adjoined by such arrow in questionable score position. For example, the gage 25 is not constructed to check arrows in questionable score position less than 2 (an inside gage would be able to check arrows having possible score values of 1). This is because the gage 25 i designed for tournament shooting in which higher score values are the rule. In such cases there is never much question about arrows having possible score values of 1. The biggest problem is determining arrows having possible score values of 3, 4 and 5. Presently in archery the unaided eye is used to determine score values and in most cases determination is by guess particularly where the circular boundary is chewed up from embedment of arrows. It is not uncommon for an arrow to tear up a portion of a circular boundary as it embeds itself in the target. The circle which defines the bulls eye, such as circle 12 shown in FIG. 1, is the one that is subjected to the greatest abuse in tournament shooting. The gage 25 is unaffected by the condition of this circle 12 for checking an arrow such as the arrow 18 but, of course, is dependent upon a readable condition of that portion of the circle 13 opposite the arrow, i.e. in the area where the radius 32 crosses the circle 13. It is not too likely that this portion of the circle would be chewed up but if it is it can be reconstructed even if from a separate clear plastic member bearing arcs of the circles 12 through 15 which would be thin enough to slide under the gage 25. If it was thought to be warranted for this limited purpose a larger outside gage, e.g. spanning two annular areas, could be constructed. The gage 25is accurate to a degree which far surpasses the tolerances normally expected in the printing of target faces on paper and the like. Referring to FIGS. 10 through 13, 111 designates a portion of an archery target having a target face thereon which, in the instance, corresponds with the Official P.A.A. 3 foot Outdoor Target Face. The target portion 111 has arrows 40 and 42 embedded therein in questionable score positions closely adjoining the circles 112 and 113, respectively. Against each such arrow is shown another archery score determining gage according to my invention, generally designated 45, to gage in the case of the arrow 40 whether it is wholly within the annular area 4 or whether it is in both the annular areas 4 and 5. The gage 45 is in the form of a polygon having convex arcuate sides designated 5 through 1 which are circular and have radii equal, respectively, to the radii of the circles, such as 112 through 116 defining the target areas 5 through 1 on the target face shown in part in FIG. 10. In the instance the radius of curvature of the side 5 is 3.600 inches; that of the side 4 is 7.200 inches; etc. to that of the side 1 which is 18.000 inches. The gage 45 has an annular flat back face 48 and a raised center section provided with a central aperture 49 as in the case of the gage 25. The gage 45 is used as best shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 by moving it flat on the target face so that in the case of any size arrow located as shown for the arrow 40 the convex side 5 of the gage tangentially engages the shaft of the arrow 40. If the side 4 is unable to line up with the portion of the circle 113 on each side of the arrow 40 this means that the latter is embedded in both of the annular areas 4 and 3 and the proper score value to be assigned to the arrow 40 is 4. If the side 4 is able to line up with such portion of the circle 113 (or move beyond it into the area 3) this means that the arrow 42 is embedded wholly within the area 3 and the proper score value to be assigned thereto is 3. Other arrows in questionable score positions adjoining other target areas can be similarly checked with the other sides of the gage 45 by sighting to other target area boundaries such as shown in FIG. 10 for the arrow 40 which is being checked with the side 5 by sighting to the circle 112. The gage 45 is an inside gage as in use as shown in FIG. 10; it is disposed within the area, such as the area 5, which the arrow in question, such as the arrow 40, adjoins. It will thus be seen that there has been provided by my invention archery score determining means and process in which the object hereinabove set forth together with many thoroughly practical advantages has been successfully achieved. My means and process are especially valuable in tournament shooting where the total scores of the leading contestants are close and considerable prize money is divided among the top winners. Changes may be made from the forms shown of my archery score determining gages without departing from the spirit of my invention as defined in the appended claims. What is claimed is: 1. Archery score determining means for determining the proper score value to be assigned to an arrow embedded in an archery target in questionable score position on the target face adjoining a target area boundary comprising: (a) an archery score determining gage means having shaft engaging means for tangentially engaging the shaft of an arrow, said shaft engaging means being in the form of a socket indented from an edge surface, the socket being formed on a circular arc, the radius of which is equal to that of said arrow shaft; and (b) sight means provided on said gage so that said sight means is disposed in close proximity to a target area boundary when said shaft engaging means is so engaged with said arrow shaft, the contiguity of said sight means to such boundary providing accurate determination as to the score value to be assigned to said arrow, said sight means being in the form of a socket indented from an edge surface, the socket being formed on a circular arc, the radius of which is equal to that of said arrow shaft, the extent of such are being sufiicient to gage the diameter of said arrow shaft. 2. In the archery score determining means as claimed in claim 1, wherein the said sockets are disposed on a straight line and spaced apart from their centers equal to the radial distance between immediately adjacent target boundaries. 3. In the archery score determining means as claimed in claim 1, wherein the gage means consists of a disc-like member having a set of shaft engaging sockets indented from and disposed around one half of its circumference and a set of other sockets indented from and disposed around the other half of its circumference, the sockets of each set being formed on a circular arc the radii of which are different and equal, respectively, to that of the different size arrow shafts. 4 In the archery score determining means as claimed in claim 3, wherein the corresponding sockets of each set are disposed on a diameter of said member and spaced apart from their centers equal to the radial distance between immediately adjacent target boundaries. 5. In the archery score determining means as claimed in claim 4, wherein said disc-like member is adapted to rotate flat upon the target face and is provided with a flat back face for this purpose. 6. In an archery score determining structure, the combination comprising: (a) a disc-like archery score determining gage, said gage provided with a circular circumferential peripheral edge portion; and (b) at least one pair of diametrically opposed spaced apart open end sockets defined in said peripheral edge portion, said pair of sockets having an arcuate configuration adapted to engage an arrow shaft of a predetermined diameter, said opposing sockets being spaced apart from each other between their centers a distance equal to a predetermined radial distance between concentric circles on a target face. 7. In the archery score determining structure as claimed in claim 6, wherein one socket of said pair of sockets comprises a circular arc sufiicient to enable the said socket to act as an outside diameter gage for an arrow shaft having a predetermined diameter. 8. In the archery score determining structure as claimed in claim 7, wherein a plurality of pairs of diametrically opposed spaced apart open end sockets are defined in said peripheral edge portion, each of said pairs of sockets adapted to engage an arrow shaft having a different outside diameter. References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,881,651 10/1932 Judge 33-478 X 2,264,296 12/1941 Clark 33174 2,521,087 9/1950 Paulus 33174 2,667,189 9/1954 Wiles 33 174 2,682,112 6/1954 Jorgensen 33174 SAMUEL S. MATTHEWS, Primary Examiner.

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    US-1881651-AOctober 11, 1932Greenfield Tap & Die CorpGauge
    US-2264296-ADecember 02, 1941Everett H ClarkBullet hole gauge
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    US-2682112-AJune 29, 1954Grover W JorgensenGauge for scoring hits on targets

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