Reinforced textile flyer

Abstract

Claims

1. A ROTARY TEXTILE FLYER HAVING AN INVERTED SUBSTANTIALLY U-SHAPED BODY COMPRISING A PAIR OF OPPOSED ARCUATE UPPER SECTIONS AND A PAIR OF OPPOSED ELONGATE FIRST AND SECOND LEGS DEPENDING FROM THE UPPER SECTIONS, SAID FIRST LEG BEING HOLLOW, A PRESSER MOUNTED FOR ANGULAR MOVEMENT ON SAID FIRST LEG AND HAVING A PRESSER FOOT THEREON FOR DIRECTING ROVING THEREFROM IN A PACKAGEFORMING OPERATION; A RIB CONNECTED TO AND EXTENDING ALONG A MAJOR PORTION OF THE LENGTH OF EACH LEG, SAID RIBS BEING IN DIAMETRICALLY OPPOSED RELATIONSHIP AND PROJECTING RADIALLY OF THE AXIS OF THE FLYER WITH SAID RIBS BEING OF LESSER WIDTH THAN THE CORRESPONDING LEGS AND COOPERATING THEREWITH TO CREATE SUBSTANTIAL TURBULENCE IN THE AIR AROUND THE LEGS DURING ROTATION OF THE FLYER TO MINIMIZE ACCUMULATION OF LINT ON SAID LEGS.
May 9, 1967 I c. J. COSTNER REINFORCED TEXT ILE FLYER 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 27, 1964 INVENTO N ER BHQwrJd/J% C LAXZENCE-JACKSO N CosT ATTORNEYS y 9, 1957 c. J. COSTNER 3,31%,U79 REINFORCED TEXTILE FLYER Filed Nov. 27, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 0 INVENTOR. p CLARENCE JACKSON CosTNER wfiidr g j $714414 ATTORNEYS y 9, 1957 c. J. COSTNER 3,318,079 REINFORCED TEXT ILE FLYER Filed Nov. 27, 1964 3 Sheets-$heet 5 INVENTOR: CLARENCE JAcKsoN CosTNE-R ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,318,079 REINFORCED TEXTILE FLYER Clarence Jackson Costner, Bessemer City, N.C., assignor to Ideal Industries, Inc., Bessemer City, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed Nov. 27, 1964. Ser. No. 414,100 8 Claims. (Cl. 57117) This invention relates to flyers, such as are used on slubbers, roving frames and analogous fly frames, and more especially, to improvements in flyers of inverted U-shaped construction as opposed to that type of a flyer having its legs interconnected at both ends. As is well known, inverted U-shaped flyers are mounted on the upper ends of rotating spindles and each include a hollow leg having a presser thereon and a stabilizing leg. The flyers direct rovings from drafting rolls through the hollow leg thereof to and through a presser paddle or foot to a corresponding rotating bobbin concentric with and located between the legs of each flyer, there being relative vertical traversing movement between the flyers and bobbins for laying the roving on the bobbins in successive coiled layers. Fly frames are constructed with adjacent spindles as close as practicable to each other in accordance with the size of roving packages to be wound thereon with a minimum of clearance between the legs of adjacent rotating flyers. Now, in order to increase production of existing fly frames, the speed of the flyers and bobbins and the diameter of the packages are increased as much as possible. Therefore, it is very important that the flyers are accurately balanced to avoid excessive vibration thereof at high speeds and that the centrifiugal force acting on the flyers at high speeds does not flex the flyer legs outwardly excessively and thereby cause the roving to be wound on the bobbins in an irregular manner and/ or cause interengagement of the legs of adjacent flyers. Also, it is important that the accumulation of lint on the flyer is kept to a minimum, especially at the threading slot in the hollow leg of the flyer. Otherwise, the roving passing through the hollow leg will sometimes pick up lint from the threading slot and such lint is wound in the form of wads or slubs onto the bobbins or it causes the roving to break as it approaches the presser foot. It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide an improved flyer and means for reinforcing the same so as to decrease the tendency of the flyer legs to balloon or flex at high speeds while facilitating accurate balancing of the flyer, and which reinforcing means is so constructed and positioned as to reduce the tendency for lint to accumulate on the flyer. Various attempts have been made heretofore to reinforce inverted U-shaped flyers so as to permit higher speed operation of fly frames, but to my knowledge, such attempts have improved the flyers only to a limited extent inadequate for operation at the higher speeds now in demand by the textile industry. For example, in such prior attempts, downwardly diverging reinforcing rods or vanes were connected to the two opposed arcuate portions of a flyer, with the lower ends of the rods or vanes terminating at the junctures of the flyer legs with the respective arcuate portions. Such prior arrangements served only to lend rigidity to the upper portions of the flyer legs without reinforcing the major or lower portions thereof, with the result that the lower ends of the flyer legs would still flex outwardly or balloon excessively at the high speeds at which fly frames otherwise may be operated. While the aforementioned vanes produced some turbulence in the air surrounding the flyer, such turbulence was ineffective to reduce materially any accumulation of lint on the legs of the flyer. It is a more specific object of this invention, therefore, to provide a new or rebuilt flyer with reinforcing means extending along a major portion of each flyer leg and each arcuate portion and wherein the reinforcing means, at least for each flyer leg, is in the form of an elongate rib connected to the flyer leg. One rib projects inwardly from the hollow leg and the other ri-b projects outwardly from the stabilizing leg so said one rib will not interfere with the threading slot in the outer portion of the hollow leg or interfere with operation of the shank of the presser, and so the other rib will not require that the package diameter be reduced in order to clear the latter rib. Further, by having one rib projecting inwardly from the hollow leg and having the other rib projecting outwardly from the stabilizing leg, the two ribs trace paths of different radii. Thus, each rib creates considerable turbulen'ce with movement of each leg through the air. Also, it is believed that the .air streams created by these two paths result in a considerable increase in air turbulence around the legs of the flyers and that this feature substantially reduces the problem of lint accumulating around the flyer legs, in view of the fact that applicant has determined that the flyers of the instant invention may normally be used for five or six doffs of the fly frame before the need for cleaning arises. This compares with conventional flyers normally requiring cleaning after each doif. Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of a preferred embodiment of the flyer of the present invention associated with a partially filled bobbin; FIGURES 2 and 3 are elevations looking at the respective left-hand and right-hand sides of FIGURE 1; FIGURE 4 is an elevation, partially in section, taken substantially along line 4--4 in FIGURE 1; FIGURE 5 is an enlarged sectional plan view taken along line 5-5 in FIGURE 1; FIGURE 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the lower left-hand portion of FIGURE 1 showing the presser foot in its ideal position for properly laying the roving on the package; FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 showing an undesirable position which the presser foot of a conventional flyer may occupy when the corresponding leg of the flyer is flexed outwardly unduly by centrifugal force during high speed operation of the flyer; FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional plan view taken substantially along line 8-43 in FIGURE 6; FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 9-9 in FIGURE 6; FIGURE 10 is a plan view similar to FIGURE 5 but showing the flyer legs in two different positions and showing the flow of air relative to the flyer legs and the conflicting air turbulence produced by the reinforcement on the two legs; FIGURE 11 illustrates the undesirable position a presser foot may occupy relative to the bobbin if the hollow flyer leg happens to flex outwardly excessively; and FIGURE 12 is a sectional view through a roving package illustrating in solid lines the amount of roving which may be wound on a bobbin by use of the reinforced flyer of the present invention as compared to the amount defined by dotted lines which may be wound satisfactorily on a bobbin when using a conventional flyer. Referring more specifically to the drawings, the flyer 10 of the present invention is shown in FIGURE I mounted on the upper end of a spindle 11 which is usually driven at constant speed and on which a bobbin 12 is loosely positioned. The bobbin 12 includes a body 13 and an enlarged base 14 and is provided with a con- Cave curved surface 12a at the juncture of body 13 and base 14. As is well known in the art, bobbin 12 is reciprocated vertically relative to flyer 1t) and spindle 11 and is rotated at progressively reducing speeds relative to flyer and spindle 11 during each run or winding cycle in winding a roving R onto the bobbin 12 in successive layers to form a package P which is usually tapered at its upper and lower ends. With the exception of the reinforcing means to be later described, flyer It is of conventional construction. Flyer 10 is of inverted substantially U-shaped configuration and has a pair of opposed interconnected first and second arcuate sections 15, 16 which collectively form a bight portion. The central portion of the bight portion has a barrel 17 thereon provided with an axial bore 26 and a lateral opening 21. Bore 2t) fits on the upper end of spindle 11. First and second legs 22, 23 straddle package P and bobbin 12 and are formed integrally and coextensively with the respective arcuate sections 15, 16. Arcuate section is open at its upper end and is hollow. Leg 22 also is hollow and open at its lower end to form a passage 24 for guiding roving R as it is drawn from the usual drafting rolls, not shown, into the bore 2t} through opening 21, partially around barrel 17, through passage 24, around a presser arm 25 and through the eye 26 of a presser foot or paddle 27 to be wound onto bobbin 12. The outer portion of hollow leg 22 is provided With a longitudinally extending curvilinear slot 30 to permit threading roving R within passage 24. conventionally, the upper portion of leg 22 has an inwardly projecting lug 31 thereon and formed with a notch 32 therein in which a curved piece 33 is loosely positioned and supported for angular movement about leg 22. Curved piece 33 is a part of the presser, broadly designated at 34, and which includes an elongate balance stem 35 extending substantially parallel with leg 22 and having a split collar 36 on its lower end which is loosely mounted for angular movement on the lower end of leg 22. Presser arm 25 is integral with split collar 36. The upper edge of presser foot 27 has a slot 37 therein for threading roving R into eye 26 and, as best shown in FIGURES 6, 8 and 9, the inner face of presser foot 27 has an elongate recessed guide surface or groove 40 therein which tapers to infinity from the eye 26 to a point adjacent the free end of presser foot 27. FIGURE 6 shows the guide surface 40 extending perpendicular or at a right angle to the vertical axis of bobbin 12 and package P, as is desirable throughout the run. This arrangement insures that successive convolutions of roving are properly positioned with respect to each other in accordance with the programmed requirements of the fly frame. Further, the condition of FIGURE 6 serves to cause the guide surface 40 to condense the roving R slightly just before it is laid onto package P thereby reducing or minimizing fuzziness and shedding of the roving. By way of comparison, FIGURES 7 and 11 illustrate the condition or positions of the presser foot when the supporting leg therefor is flexed outwardly of its normal position by centrifugal force at high speeds as is frequently the case with conventional flyers. Accordingly, those parts of the conventional fiyer 10' and associated bobbin 12 in FIGURES 7 and 11 shall bear the same reference characters as like or similar parts shown in FIGURE 6, but have the prime notation added. It will be noted that, when the flyer leg 22 is flexed outwardly of its normal, desired position as shown in FIGURE 7, the presser foot 27 occupies an angular lower-than-normal position with respect to the path of the roving passing from the eye 26 to the package P. Thus, the roving moves in a path offset with respect to the axis of guide surface 40 so the roving is not properly condensed by the guide surface 40', but instead, the roving rides against one edge of guide surface 40 as it leaves eye 26', thus aggravating the problem of lint shedding from the roving. When the presser foot is deflected downwardly of its intended position as in FIGURE 7, it also causes the roving convolutions to be formed irregularly so the convolutions in successive layers may not be wound properly. This also produces undesirable variations in roving tension and package density. It will be observed in FIGURE 11 that the presser foot 27 of the conventional type of flyer is engaging the curved surface 12a at the juncture of the body 13' and base 14 of the corresponding bobbin 12', a condition which could exist in the course of laying the first few convolutions of roving R on the bobbin 12. In so doing. it will be noted that the curved surface 12a causes the presser foot 27 to move outwardly away from the bobbin body 13' or the corresponding coils of roving being wound thereon. This results in the roving R actually being pulled away from the body 13 or the previously wound coils of roving. While the condition of the presser foot 27 shown in FIGURE 11 could occur due to excessive ballooning of the flyer leg 22 (FIGURE 7) causing the presser foot 27 to be deflected downwardly of its normal or intended position during high speed operation of the fly frame, such condition cannot be tolerated because the movement of the presser foot 27 outwardly of its intended position by engagement thereof with the curved surface 12a causes irregular winding of the roving and, more importantly, would usually cause breakage of the roving R. Since a fly frame includes a large number of flyers and the hollow legs of the various conventional flyers on a given fly frame may flex outwardly various distances with respect to each other during high speed operation of the fly frame, it follows that the various presser feet 27' on the fly frame would also be deflected downwardly different amounts with respect to each other. Accordingly, it has been necessary heretofore to adjust the conventional bobbin traverse mechanism so that the presser foot on the weakest or least rigid hollow leg 22 of all the flyers on the particular fly frame would not engage the curved surface 12a of the corresponding bobbin 12' during ballooning of the flyers at high speed operation there of when the bobbins reached their highest position at the end of successive strokes thereof. On the other hand, the bobbin traverse mechanism also had to be adjusted so that the extent of downward movement of the bobbins during the winding of the first few layers of roving thereon would not be such that the presser foot on that flyer having the strongest hollow leg of all the flyers on the fly frame would be so close to the upper ends of the bobbins as to cause the uppermost coils on the bobbins to be inadequately supported. It follows, therefore, that the length of traverse of the bobbins relative to the conventional flyers had to be limited heretofore to properly accommodate that flyer that ballooned the most and that flyer that ballooned the least, as indicated, for example, by the dotted lines m in FIGURE 12, with full lines M representing the increased length of traverse obtainable by this invention. It can be seen therefore that the excessive flexing or ballooning of the legs of conventional flyers has presented many problems on fly frames and has limited the production capacity of fly frames especially to the extent that they have limited the amount of roving which could be wound onto a bobbin of given size as compared to the amount which otherwise could be wound on the bobbin if the problem of excessive ballooning of the flyer legs did not exist. Now, in order that existing U-shaped flyers or new U- shaped flyers of similar construction may be operated efficiently at higher speeds than have been practicable heretofore, I have reinforced the flyer legs throughout at least a major portion of the length thereof without materially decreasing the usable or effective space therebetween so that larger more uniformly wound packages may be wound utilizing the improved fiyers on fly frames. To this end, I have provided a first reinforcing rib 45 on and projecting substantially radially inwardly from the first or hollow leg 22 and a second reinforcing rib 46 on and projecting substantially radially outwardly from the second or stabilizing leg 23. The maximum diameter of the package P is limited by the split collar 36 at the lower end of the presser arm 35. Therefore, rib 45 projects inwardly a lesser or no greater extent from leg 22 than split collar 36. Preferably, rib 45 is formed as an extension of lug 31. Rib 45 also is integral with and serves as an extension of a first arcuate rib 50 projecting substantially radially inwardly from and extending substantially throughout the length of arcuate section 15. The lower end of rib 45 may terminate immediately above split collar 36, but is shown spaced about one inch above collar 36 so as not to interfere with wrapping the roving R around presser arm 25. In modifying existing flyers, ribs 45, 50 may be welded or otherwise suitably fused to leg 22 and arcuate section 15. In the manufacture of new fiyers, ribs 45, 50 may be fused to or formed integral with leg 22 and arcuate section 15. Rib 46 is integral with a second arcuate rib 51 projecting substantially radially outwardly from and substantially throughout the length of second arcuate section 16. The lower end of rib 46 may terminate at the lower end of leg 23 or a short distance thereabove as shown in FIGURES l and 3. Depending upon the size of the flyer and the center-to-center distance between adjacent flyers, rib as may project from leg 22 about A; to M; inch. Ribs 46, 51 also may be fused to or formed integral with leg 23 and arcuate section 16. In modifying existing fiyers, leg 23 may be provided with a shallow groove 52 along its length (FIGURE 5) with rib 46 fitting in groove 52 and secured therein by a press fit or by sweating. The stabilizing leg 23 may be of hollow or tubular construciton, if desired, in manufacturing new flyers according to this invention. Ribs 45, 46, 5t), 51 are of substantially lesser width than legs 22, 23 and arcuate sections 15, 16 for several reasons. The narrow width of the ribs provides suificient strength to the legs without unduly increasing the weight of the flyer; the narrow width of the ribs facilitates attachment thereof to existing or new flyers; since the leg 22 is substantially circular in cross-section and leg 23 is substantially oval-shaped in cross-section, the ribs provide abrupt interruptions in the contour of the legs and arcuate sections of the flyer which create turbulence in the air adjacent the flyer during rotation thereof thereby preventing lint from readily accumulating on the flyer as is the case with conventional flyers; and the narrow ribs may be easily ground to remove stock therefrom as may be required in order to dynamically balance the flyer lit with its presser 34 to avoid vibration during rotation thereof. Ribs 46, 51 are also of small cross-sectional area so stabilizing leg 23 may be bent as desired to further effect proper dynamic balancing of the flyer. In practice, it was found that about 20% more roving may be wound on a package P about inches long and 5 inches diameter when using a flyer reinforced according to the present invention as compared to using a conventional flyer. One of the reasons why the package size could be increased is because, by decreasing the tendency for the flyer legs to flex outwardly, the distance between the flyer legs of the present flyer may be increased, as compared to the distance between the legs of conventional fiyers, without the legs of adjacent fiyers engaging each other. After reason why the reinforced flyer of the present invention permits a substantial increase in the size of the package is, by decreasing the tendency for the fiyer legs to flex outwardly, the transverse mechanism may be adjusted so the maximum stroke of the presser foot 27 is such that the presser foot moves much closer to the base of the bobbin than has been practicable heretofore. Thus, the overall length of the package P may be greater as indicated by the solid lines M in FIGURE 12. Further, whereas a conventional 10" X 5 flyer could be rotated at a maximum speed of about 900 rpm, a flyer reinforced according to this invention was operated satisfactorily at a speed of about 1600 rpm. It is well known that an object having a smooth rounded leading edge portion generally produces less turbulence when moving through the air than an object having a flat or abruptly irregularly contoured leading edge. Thus, by referring to FIGURE 10, it will be noted that the irregular leading and trailing edges provided on the flyer legs 22, 23 by the projecting ribs 45, 46 interrupt the smooth flow of air past the legs 22, 23 so the air is caused to flow in divers directions substantially as in dicated by the arrows. As the air is divertedoutwardly at each leg, it produces negative pressure closely adjacent the exterior surfaces of the legs and ribs, thus ending to deflect lint away from the flyer legs. This is very important because, if lint is permitted to accumulate on the flyer legs, it forms into wads which get onto the roving being wound. In particular, if lint is permitted to accumulate adjacent the threading slot 30, it sometimes is moved along this slot by the roving R and clogs the open lower end of the passage 24 to such extent as to snarl and break the roving or to be picked up by the roving and carried into the package P. To further assist in minimizing accumulation of lint on the fiyer legs, it will be noted that the ribs 22, 23 trace circular paths of different diameters so the turbulence created by each rib increases the turbulence of the air at the other rib, as indicated by comparing the solid and broken line positions of the flyer legs in FIGURE 10. It is thus seen that the improved reinforced flyer permits increasing the speed of fly frames: to about twice the speed they could be operated when using conventional inverted U-shaped flyers thereon, While improving the quality of the roving and resulting in improved efficiency in the operation of spinning frames on which the roving packages subsequently may be used. In the drawings and specification there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention and, al though specific terms are employed, they are use-d in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims. I claim: I. A rotary textile flyer having an inverted substantially U-shaped body comprising a pair of opposed arcuate upper sections and a pair of opposed elongate first and second legs depending from the upper sections, said first leg being hollow, a presser mounted for angular movement on said first leg and having a presser foot thereon for directing roving therefrom in a packageforming operation; a rib connected to and extending along a major portion of the length of each leg, said ribs being in diametrically opposed relationship and projecting radially of the axis of the flyer with said ribs being of lesser width than the corresponding legs and cooperating therewith to create substantial turbulence in the air around the legs during rotation of the flyer to minimize accumulation of lint on said legs. 2. A rotary textile flyer having an inverted substantially U-shaped body comprising a pair of opposed arcuate upper sections and a pair of opposed elongate first and second legs depending from the upper sections, said first leg being hollow, a presser mounted for angular movement on said first leg and having a presser foot thereon for directing roving therefrom in a package-forming operation; means extending along a major portion of the length of each leg for reinforcing the legs and for creating turbulence in the air around the legs when the flyer is rotated to minimize accumulation of lint on the legs, said means being in the form of projecting ribs providing abrupt interruptions on the legs. 3. In a flyer having an inverted substantially U-shaped body comprising a pair of opposed arcuate upper sections and a pair of opposed elongate legs depending from the upper sections, a centrally located substantially vertical barrel carried by and located at the juncture of said arcuate sections, one of said legs and its respective arcuate section being hollow and open at both ends for passage of roving therethrough and having a presser thereon with a presser foot on said presser; means to restrain said legs from ballooning due to centrifugal force during rotation of the flyer and for creating turbulences at said legs to minimize accumulation of lint thereon comprising an elongate rib connected to and extending along a major portion of the length of each leg, the rib connected to said hollow leg projecting inwardly toward the other leg, and the rib connected to said other leg projecting outwardly away from said hollow leg. 4. A flyer according to claim 3, wherein said ribs are of substantially less width than the width of the corresponding legs. 5. In a flyer having an inverted substantially U-shaped body comprising a pair of opposed arcuate upper sections and a pair of opposed elongate legs depending from the upper sections, a centrally located substantially vertical barrel carried by and located at the juncture of said arcuate sections, one of said legs and its respective arcuate section being hollow and open at both ends for passage of roving therethrough and having a presser thereon with a presser foot on said presser; reinforcing means to restrain said legs from ballooning due to centrifugal force during rotation of the flyer comprising an elongate rib connected to and extending along a major portion of each leg and along a major portion of the length of each arcuate section, the rib connected to said hollow leg projecting inwardly toward the other leg, and the rib connected to said other leg projecting outwardly away from said hollow leg. 6. A structure according to claim 5, wherein said ribs are integral with said legs. 7. A structure according to claim 5, wherein said other leg has a longitudinally extending groove therein and wherein the corresponding rib is connected to said other leg by fitting tightly in said groove. 3. A structure according to claim 5, wherein said ribs are fused to said legs. References Qited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 694,876 3/1902 Meller 57-1 17 2,535,736 12/1950 Hattersley 57-117 2,814,177 11/1957 Meyer-Busche 57117 2,919,535 1/1960 Robinson 57115 3,157,020 11/ 1964 Schwager 57-117 FRANK I. COHEN, Primary Examiner. A. I. SIDOTI, Assistant Examiner. UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 3 318 079 May 9 1967 Clarence Jackson Costner hat error appears in the above numbered pat- It is hereby certified t e said Letters Patent should read as ent requiring correction and that th corrected below. Column 1, line 33, for "centrifiugal" read centrifugal column 5, line 72, for "After" read Another line 75, for "transverse" read traverse column 6, line 21, for "ending" read tending Signed and sealed this 14th day of November 1967. (SEAL) Attest: EDWARD J BRENNER Commissioner of Patents Edward M. Fletcher, It. Attesting Officer

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    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
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    US-2814177-ANovember 26, 1957Meyer-Busche GertFlyers for use in connection with spinning machines
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Cited By (5)

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    DE-1685910-B1January 13, 1972Maier Eugen MetallverarbeitungFlyerfluegel oder Spinnfluegel
    US-3413795-ADecember 03, 1968Eugen C Maier MetallverarbeituFlyer for spinning machines
    US-3474614-AOctober 28, 1969Maier Eugen MetallverarbeitungFlyer for spinning yarn
    US-3548583-ADecember 22, 1970Walter C Boyter, John Matthew QuinnFlyer presser assembly
    US-4361005-ANovember 30, 1982Zinser Textilmaschinen GmbhAssembly for winding up textile filaments